Science Training: Supporting Careers in Wildlife Management

Panel Discussion

Nontraditional pathways to career development have been in the news lately due to the pandemic’s restructuring to an increasingly remote reality. Higher education has recently experienced a surge in demand for certificate and career-focused programs creating an opening for meaningful science training for current and future professionals. Preparing these practitioners demands focused consideration of the scientific method, data collection and analysis, knowledge synthesis and communication, reading and understanding scholarly research, and application of learning to real-world scenarios. As online science educators, our panel will discuss current approaches, projects, and lessons learned in courses related to biology, botany, conservation, ornithology, zoology, wildlife management, geography, and evaluating scholarly research for remote learners. The panel discussion will begin with a brief introduction by each speaker presenting a project or approach to teaching science, followed by a series of prepared questions with time for audience engagement. The discussion will include how to translate classroom learning into applied skills. This presentation would fit best as a panel discussion, bringing educators, students, and early career professionals together to discuss skills and training needs in the natural sciences, wildlife management, and related disciplines. Panelists: Priscilla Coulter, M.S. – Biology & Library Science Priscilla is a science librarian who, even after two decades, can’t quite believe that it’s her job to help students immerse themselves in scientific literature.  She acts as a mentor to students, guiding them toward efficient, critical research strategies…and keeping the excitement of curiosity and discovery at the forefront of the research process. Erin Felicetti, PhD – Horticulture Dr. Erin Felicetti is a molecular plant physiologist, focused mostly on post-harvest disorders and successful growth of agricultural crops via genetic discovery and possible manipulation. One of her goals teaching Botany and Plant Science is to help students discover all of the possible fields they can enter using these degrees, including habitat food plot management. Dylan Maddox, PhD – Ornithology Dr. J. Dylan Maddox is a molecular biologist who studies birds when given a chance but also has projects involving tropical plants, clams, and microbiology. He instructs courses in ornithology, wildlife management, conservation biology, and population ecology. James Myers, PhD – Geography Dr. Jim Myers is an environmental geographer, studying the interactions between landscape change and environmental management at local and regional scales. He likes to engage students with location based exercises when teaching physical geography online, which helps students sharpen their observation skills and connect conceptual knowledge to their everyday experience. Julie Thompson, PhD – Zoology Dr. Julie Tolman Thompson is a broadly trained biologist that has made contributions in diverse fields such as conservation ecology, animal behavior, and evolutionary genetics.  In addition to teaching, she has previously worked as an ecologist in private and government sectors. She has a passion for undergraduate teaching and, in particular, working with students in her mammalogy, vertebrate zoology and research methods courses to design and conduct original research projects. Moderators: Kelly Chinners Reiss, PhD – Environmental Engineering Sciences Dr. Kelly Chinners Reiss is a wetland community ecologist whose research occurs across scales from biological assessment to landscapes. Dr. Reiss is a Professor in Environmental Science, is a Certified Senior Ecologist through the Ecological Society of America (ESA), and is a faculty co-advisor of the APUS TWS student chapter and the APUS student chapter of the National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP). She is co-lead on WaterTAP (Water Testing and Awareness Project), a citizen science project for drinking water analysis. Daniela Messina, DC – Chiropractic Dr. Daniela Messina is an Associate Professor in Natural Science and is a published member of the National Science Teaching Association (NSTA), a member of the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS), a member of the American Association for Anatomy, and a licensed acupuncturist through the State of New York. She is co-lead on WaterTAP (Water Testing and Awareness Project), a citizen science project for drinking water analysis.
 
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Panel Discussion
Location: Virtual Date: November 5, 2021 Time: 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm