FISH, HUNT & CAMP IN NC

Where should you go hunting and fishing in North Carolina?

October is a great month for hunting and fishing in North Carolina, so we hope you’ll extend your trip to our state for the 2016 TWS Conference to experience some of our best outdoor recreational opportunities.

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is the state agency responsible for the conservation and management of the fisheries and wildlife resources, and enforcement the hunting, fishing, trapping, and boating laws, in North Carolina. For any questions related to hunting and fishing in NC, contact the NCWRC at 1-888-248-6834.

Hunting
What’s in Season?

Although North Carolina has many other species to hunt, the ones listed below are the only species in season during the month of October 2016. To see their hunting seasons, click here.

Big Game

  • White-tailed deer
  • Black bear

 

Small Game and Other Seasons

  • Squirrel (red, eastern gray, fox)
  • Raccoon
  • Fox (red and gray)
  • Opossum
  • Bobcat
  • Coyote
  • Groundhog
  • Nutria
  • Striped Skunk
  • Armadillo
  • Crow
  • Ruffed grouse
Mourning Dove (and White-winged Dove) *

Waterfowl*

  • Ducks
  • Mergansers
  • Coots
  • Sea Ducks
  • Canada Geese & White-fronted Geese
  • Snow Geese, Ross’ Geese, and Blue Geese
  • Rails
  • Moorhen
  • Gallinule

 

Webless Migratory Game Birds*

  • Snipe
*Season dates will be available for these species once the federal framework is approved and the NC Wildlife Resources Commission approves specific dates within that framework (usually around July)

LICENSING
Depending on which species you plan to hunt in North Carolina, you may need multiple licenses. Hunting licenses and privileges can be purchased on-line in advance of arriving, or during your stay, in Raleigh.

All non-resident hunters will need a 10-day non-resident basic hunting license.

To hunt deer, you will also need a 10-day non-resident big game hunting privilege.

To hunt bear, you will also need the following:

  • 10-day non-resident big game hunting privilege,
  • a bear management e-stamp, and
  • a non-resident bear hunting license.

To hunt waterfowl, you will also need the following:

  • a non-resident waterfowl hunting license,
  • a federal duck stamp, and
  • HIP certification.

If you plan to hunt on public game lands, you will also need a non-resident Game Lands license.

For license fees and requirements, click here. For license and privilege purchasing, click here to access the on-line purchasing system, or call 1-888-248-6834. If you have any questions about licensing requirements or fees, contact the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission at 1-888-248-6834.

WHERE?
North Carolina is home to more than 2 million acres of game lands (including 1.3 million acres of national forests), managed by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for hunting, fishing, trapping, boating, and outdoor recreation.
For more information on public land hunting opportunities (game lands), click here.
Some game lands offer permit hunt opportunities. For more information, click here.
For specific regulations on each game land, click here.

REGULATIONS DIGEST
All of the North Carolina hunting and fishing rules and regulations are published each year in the Regulations Digest. To download a copy (pdf), click here. The 2016-2017 Regulations Digest will be available after July 1, 2016.

Fishing

WHAT?
Freshwater Fishing
North Carolina is home to over 30 species of common freshwater sport fish. For identification tips, fishing techniques, seasons and limits, and regulations for each species, click here.

Saltwater Fishing
Coastal recreational fishing is regulated by the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries. For information on species found in state coastal waters or the Exclusive Economic Zone, including regulations, bag and size limits, and fish identification, click here.

Trout Fishing
Three species of trout can be found in North Carolina waters: rainbow trout, brook trout, and brown trout. The brook trout is the only one native to North Carolina. For more information about trout fishing, stocking schedules, regulations, and publicly accessible trout waters, click here.

WHERE?
There are more than 500 publicly accessible places to fish in North Carolina. You can find information on the location of publicly accessible fishing piers, boat ramps, and canoe launches, as well as places that provide bank and wade fishing opportunities here.

LICENSING
For fishing in inland waters, you will need a 10-day basic non-resident inland fishing license. To fish trout, you will also need a special trout fishing license.

For fishing in coastal and joint waters, you will need a 10-day non-resident coastal recreational fishing license.
For license fees and requirements, click here. For license and privilege purchasing, click here to access the on-line purchasing system, or call 1-888-248-6834. If you have any questions about licensing requirements or fees, contact the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission at 1-888-248-6834.

REGULATIONS DIGEST
All of the North Carolina hunting and fishing rules and regulations are published each year in the Regulations Digest. To download a copy (pdf), click here. The 2016-2017 Regulations Digest will be available after July 1, 2016.

Camping Information
One of the best ways to experience the great outdoors of North Carolina is to go camping. Whether you are interested in camping on national forests, state parks, national parks or seashores, or other unique places, we’ve got it all!

WHERE?
National Forests
North Carolina is home to 4 national forests – Nantahala, Pisgah, Croatan, and Uwharrie – encompassing 1.25 million acres and open to visitors year-round for camping. For information on camping regulations and fees, cabin rentals, and forest maps, click here.

State Parks
One of the nation’s first state parks (Mount Mitchell) was created in North Carolina 100 years ago, and the North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreation is celebrating its centennial this year. Although not all state parks allow camping, there are over 20 locations that do. To find out which parks allow camping, find the best camping spot, or to reserve a camp site, click here.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park
GSMNP is the most visited national park in the United States, with over 9 million visitors each year. For more information on campground rules and regulations, including backcountry, frontcountry, group campgrounds, and horse camps, click here.

National Seashores
North Carolina has 2 national seashores: Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout. For camping information on Cape Hatteras National Seashore, click here. For camping information on Cape Lookout National Seashore, click here.

Everywhere Else
For all other camping opportunities in North Carolina, visit North Carolina’s tourism website. Scroll down the page to find the search engine.

Wildlife Viewing & Hiking Information

The 2016 TWS Conference will coincide with peak leaf season, so we encourage you to extend your trip to North Carolina and visit our wonderful outdoors.